An Essay on the Principle of Population

AN ESSAY ON THE PRINCIPLE OF POPULATION is one of the earliest works on population increase and its effects on society. Malthus noted that the endless increase in population was unsustainable and would be eventually checked by disease, war, or famine (Malthusian Catastrophes). In his view, Malthus believed that progress toward a utopian society would eventually be halted by population growth.

Title page of Thomas Robert Malthus's: An Essay on the Principle of Population

This annotated copy of Thomas Malthus’s An Essay on the Principle of Population (1826 edition) was owned by Charles Darwin, who was impressed by Malthus’s ideas about how the environment constrains populations.


An Essay on the Principle of Population

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Two hundred years ago, Thomas Malthus, in An Essay on the Principle of Population, reached the conclusion that the number of people in the world will increase exponentially, while the ability to feed these people will only increase arithmetically (21). ... When discussing Hardin"s essays it is necessary to confront the problem of immigration. ... In order to bring the population within a reasonable number, Hardin suggests population control. ... He notes that populations of poor nations double every 35 years, while the populations of rich nations double every 87 years. ... At the time Hardin w...